Your Dog’s Whining Decoded

dog's whining decoded

By vetstreet.com
By Mikkel Becker

Q. What does it mean when my dog whines — and how can I stop it?

A. At my house we affectionately call our Pug Willy Whiner. As a puppy, whenever he was tense, anxious or even excited, Willy whined. He whines less frequently now, because he has been trained not to, but when he does vocalize, whining is his go-to expression.

Dogs whine for a variety of reasons. Your dog may whine because he wants something or because he is excited. He may whine because he is apprehensive or anxious about something. A dog who is showing appeasement behavior may whine as part of his interaction with other dogs or people.

Dogs with separation anxiety may whine when you leave them, as well as engage in other behaviors, such as pacing, drooling and destruction at exit points. If your dog is exhibiting this type of behavior, talk with your veterinarian about training with a professional, and possibly medication, to help manage your dog’s anxiety.

Dogs whine for medical reasons as well, including pain and cognitive dysfunction syndrome. For this reason, it is important that you inform your veterinarian if you notice that your dog’s whining is associated with signs of pain or if you notice any behavior changes in your pet.

Identifying the Problem

The best way to handle whining is to identify the cause of the behavior and change your dog’s behavior through reward-based training. As with any situation where your dog is exhibiting heightened anxiety, punishment is not a useful training tool. If you punish your dog for whining, the vocalization may cease, but his anxiety will not change. In fact, it may very likely become worse, and your dog may respond in a more dangerous way, such as biting.

Read the rest of this article at VetStreet.com